E A R T H = H E A R T The Secret of Green

green (n., adj.) Look up green at Dictionary.com from PIE root *ghre- “grow”

grow (v.) Look up grow at Dictionary.comOld English growan (of plants) “to grow, flourish, increase, develop, get bigger” (class VII strong verb; past tense greow, past participle growen), from Proto-Germanic *gro- (cognates: Old Norse groa, Old Frisian groia, Dutch groeien, Old High German gruoen), from PIE root *ghre- (see grass). Applied in Middle English to human beings (c.1300) and animals (early 15c.) and their parts, supplanting Old English weaxan (see wax (v.)).

Have you ever heard anything about God, Topsy? … Do you know who made you?” “Nobody, as I knows on,” said the child. … “I spect I grow’d. Don’t think nobody never made me.” [Harriet B. Stowe, “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” 1851]

From this particular viewpoint, the Holy Grail is undoubtedly a type of the ark or vessel in which the life of the world is preserved and therefore is significant of the body of the Great Mother–Nature. Its green color relates it to Venus and to the mystery of generation; also to the Islamic faith, whose sacred color is green and whose Sabbath is Friday, the day of Venus.”

Nearly every Native American tribe used green face paint as an aid to night vision. (Palmer, 2006)

Languages where green and blue are one color:

In some languages, including old ChineseThai, old Japanese, and Vietnamese, the same word can mean either blue or green.[14] The Chinese character  (pronounced qīng in Mandarinao in Japanese, and thanh in Sino-Vietnamese) has a meaning that covers both blue and green; blue and green are traditionally considered shades of ““. In more contemporary terms, they are  (lán, in Mandarin) and  (, in Mandarin) respectively. Japanese also has two terms that refer specifically to the color green,  (midori, which is derived from the classical Japanese descriptive verb midoru“to be in leaf, to flourish” in reference to trees) and グリーン (guriin, which is derived from the English word “green”). However, in Japan, although the traffic lights have the same colors that other countries have, the green light is described using the same word as for blue, “aoi”, because green is considered a shade of aoi; similarly, green variants of certain fruits and vegetables such as green apples, green shiso (as opposed to red apples and red shiso) will be described with the word “aoi”. Vietnamese uses a single word for both blue and green, xanh, with variants such as xanh da trời (azure, lit. “sky blue”), lam (blue), and lục (green; also xanh lá cây, lit. “leaf green”).

“Green” in modern European languages corresponds to about 520–570 nm, but many historical and non-European languages make other choices, e.g. using a term for the range of ca. 450–530 nm (“blue/green”) and another for ca. 530–590 nm (“green/yellow”).[citation needed] In the comparative study of color terms in the world’s languages, green is only found as a separate category in languages with the fully developed range of six colors (white, black, red, green, yellow, and blue), or more rarely in systems with five colors (white, red, yellow, green, and black/blue).[15] (See distinction of green from blue)[16] These languages have introduced supplementary vocabulary to denote “green”, but these terms are recognizable as recent adoptions that are not in origin color terms (much like the English adjective orange being in origin not a color term but the name of a fruit). Thus, the Thai word เขียว besides meaning “green” also means “rank” and “smelly” and holds other unpleasant associations.[17]

The Celtic languages had a term for “blue/green/grey”, Proto-Celtic *glasto-, which gave rise to Old Irish glas “green, grey” and to Welsh glas “blue”. This word is cognate with the Ancient Greek γλαυκός “bluish green”, contrasting with χλωρός “yellowish green” discussed above.

In modern Japanese, the term for green is , while the old term for “blue/green”, blue ( Ao?) now means “blue”. But in certain contexts, green is still conventionally referred to as 青, as inblue traffic light (青信号 ao shingō?) and blue leaves (青葉 aoba?), reflecting the absence of blue-green distinction in old Japanese (more accurately, the traditional Japanese color terminology grouped some shades of green with blue, and others with yellow tones).

The Persian language is traditionally lacking a black/blue/green distinction. The Persian word سبز sabz can mean “green”, “black”, or “dark”. Thus, Persian erotic poetry, dark-skinned women are addressed as sabz-eh, as in phrases like سبز گندم گون sabz-eh-gandom-gun (literally “dark wheat colored”) or سبز مليح sabz-eh-malih (“a dark beauty”).[18] Similarly, in Sudanese Arabic, dark-skinned people are described as أخضر akhḍar, the term which in Standard Arabic stands unambiguously for “green”.[19]

 

 Kakini

To other alchemists who worked primarily with vegetable matter and processes, rather than the mineral work, the Green Lion was an image of the green raw energy of nature, “the green fuse which drives the flower” as Dylan Thomas elegantly expressed it in one of his poems. Here the Green Lion which devours the sun is the green pigment chlorophyll. The green leaves of the plant are formed out of the energy of sunlight. Alchemists often attempted to create living processes in their flasks and looked especially for precipitates or crystallisations which resembled leaves or plant forms. The Green Lion here could be a plant sap extract which was often the prima materia for their alchemical work. The Gryphon, half-eagle and half-lion, was sometimes associated with the end of this stage. The eagle nature of the Gryphon gave this hybrid being an ability to ascend in the flask, so it marked, in a sense, the spiritualisation of the Green Lion. 

http://www.levity.com/alchemy/animal.html

THE EMERALD TABLET

THE JADE BOOKS OF HEAVEN

Ideogrammic compound (會意):  (growth of plants) +  (cinnabar) –  represents growing plants. Cinnabar was used for dying items red, implying color which red stands as the most representative form of. Giving the meaning “color of growing plants”, hence blue-green.

Top component is cognate to  (grass), but bottom component now resembles the unrelated  (moon).

HAPPY EARTH DAY!!!!

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One thought on “E A R T H = H E A R T The Secret of Green

  1. You know it is just the same with everything in life.
    You’d think past teaches us at least anything, but alas.
    Hate all you want but the world is changing, and we have no control whatsoever over it.
    E.g., If only Barack had any balls to put Russian bear to his place, but it seems like it’s not happening, welcome WW3.
    A profound post, thanks!
    Sarah http://phyto-renew350i.com/

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